SDS

A listing of SDS's
SAFETY DATA SHEET
Spray Freeze
1. IDENTIFICATION
Product Identifiers
Product Name:
Spray Freeze
Other Names:
N/A
Product Number(s):
LM030
CAS Number:
-
Recommended use of the chemical and restriction on use
Laboratory use
Application is by spray atomisation from a hand held aerosol pack.
Use according to manufacturer's directions.
Aerosol refrigerant spray.
Company Details
ProSciTech Pty Ltd
11 Carlton Street
KIRWAN QLD 4817
Australia

(07) 4773 9444
www.proscitech.com
Emergency Contact Details
ProSciTech Pty Ltd
11 Carlton Street
KIRWAN QLD 4817
Australia

(07) 4773 9444
www.proscitech.com
2. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
Classification of the substance or mixture
Flammable Aerosol Category 1
Label Elements
Signal Words
Danger
Hazard Statement(s)
H222 Extremely flammable aerosol.
AUH044 Risk of explosion if heated under confinement.
Precautionary Statement(s)
P210 Keep away from heat, hot surfaces, sparks, open flames and other ignition sources. No smoking.
P211 Do not spray on an open flame or other ignition source.
P251 Do not pierce or burn, even after use
Primary route(s) of entry
Not available.
Human Health
Inhalation:
Not available.
Ingestion:
Not available.
Eyes:
Not available.
Skin:
Not available.
Environment
No further relevant information available.
3. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Name
CAS No.
Content (w/w)
Classification
Hydrocarbon propellant
68476-85-7
Not Available
-
4. FIRST AID MEASURES
Ingestion
Ingestion Not considered a normal route of entry.
Inhalation
If aerosols, fumes or combustion products are inhaled:
Remove to fresh air.
Lay patient down. Keep warm and rested.
Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to initiating first aid procedures.
If breathing is shallow or has stopped, ensure clear airway and apply resuscitation, preferably with a demand valve
Resuscitator, bag-valve mask device, or pocket mask as trained. Perform CPR if necessary.
Transport to hospital, or doctor.
Skin Contact
If solids or aerosol mists are deposited upon the skin:
Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available). Remove any adhering solids with industrial skin cleansing cream.
DO NOT use solvents.
Seek medical attention in the event of irritation.
Eye Contact
If aerosols come in contact with the eyes:
Immediately hold the eyelids apart and flush the eye continuously for at least 15 minutes with fresh running water.
Ensure complete irrigation of the eye by keeping eyelids apart and away from eye and moving the eyelids by occasionally lifting the upper and lower lids.
Transport to hospital or doctor without delay.
Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilled personnel.
Other Information
Treat symptomatically.
5. FIREFIGHTING MEASURES
Suitable extinguishing equipment
SMALL FIRE: Water spray, dry chemical or CO₂
LARGE FIRE: Water spray or fog.
HAZCHEM
Not available.
Special protective equipment and precautions for fire fighters
Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
May be violently or explosively reactive.
Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
If safe, switch off electrical equipment until vapour fire hazard removed. Use water delivered as a fine spray to control fire and cool adjacent area.
DO NOT approach containers suspected to be hot.
Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire. Equipment should be thoroughly decontaminated after use.
6. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures
Clean up all spills immediately.
Avoid breathing vapours and contact with skin and eyes.
Wear protective clothing, impervious gloves and safety glasses.
Shut off all possible sources of ignition and increase ventilation.
Wipe up.
If safe, damaged cans should be placed in a container outdoors, away from all ignition sources, until pressure has dissipated.
Undamaged cans should be gathered and stowed safely.
DO NOT exert excessive pressure on valve.
DO NOT attempt to operate damaged valve.
Environmental precautions
Clear area of personnel and move upwind.
Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
May be violently or explosively reactive.
Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water courses No smoking, naked lights or ignition sources. Increase ventilation.
Stop leak if safe to do so.
Water spray or fog may be used to disperse / absorb vapour.
Methods and materials for containment and clean up
Absorb or cover spill with sand, earth, inert materials or vermiculite. Chemwatch: 4698-51 Version No: 3.1.1.1 Page 3 of 11 Freezing Spray, 200 grm Aerosol Issue Date: 24/03/2014 Print Date: 30/01/2015 Continued...
If safe, damaged cans should be placed in a container outdoors, away from ignition sources, until pressure has dissipated.
Undamaged cans should be gathered and stowed safely.
Collect residues and seal in labelled drums for disposal.
Remove leaking cylinders to a safe place if possible.
Release pressure under safe, controlled conditions by opening the valve.
7. HANDLING AND STORAGE
Precautions for safe handling
Avoid all personal contact, including inhalation.
Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
Use in a well-ventilated area. Prevent concentration in hollows and sumps.
DO NOT enter confined spaces until atmosphere has been checked. Avoid smoking, naked lights or ignition sources.
Avoid contact with incompatible materials. When handling,
DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
DO NOT incinerate or puncture aerosol cans.
DO NOT spray directly on humans, exposed food or food utensils.
Avoid physical damage to containers.
Always wash hands with soap and water after handling. Work clothes should be laundered separately.
Use good occupational work practice.
Observe manufacturer's storage and handling recommendations contained within this MSDS.
Atmosphere should be regularly checked against established exposure standards to ensure safe working conditions are maintained.
DO NOT allow clothing wet with material to stay in contact with skin.
Keep dry to avoid corrosion of cans. Corrosion may result in container perforation.
Conditions for safe storage
Aerosol dispenser.
Check that containers are clearly labelled
Avoid reaction with oxidising agents.
Keep dry to avoid corrosion of cans. Corrosion may result in container perforation and internal pressure may eject contents of can
Store in original containers in approved flammable liquid storage area.
DO NOT store in pits, depressions, basements or areas where vapours may be trapped.
No smoking, naked lights, heat or ignition sources.
Keep containers securely sealed. Contents under pressure.
Store away from incompatible materials.
Store in a cool, dry, well ventilated area.
Avoid storage at temperatures higher than 40 deg C.
Store in an upright position.
Protect containers against physical damage.
Check regularly for spills and leaks.
8. EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION
Exposure Standards
Material
TWA ppm
TWA mg/m3
STEL ppm
STEL mg/m3
Hydrocarbon propellant
1000ppm
1800 mg/m3
-
-
Engineering controls
Engineering controls are used to remove a hazard or place a barrier between the worker and the hazard. Well-designed engineering controls can be highly effective in protecting workers and will typically be independent of worker interactions to provide this high level of protection.
The basic types of engineering controls are:
Process controls which involve changing the way a job activity or process is done to reduce the risk.
Enclosure and/or isolation of emission source which keeps a selected hazard "physically" away from the worker and ventilation that strategically "adds" and "removes" air in the work environment.
Ventilation can remove or dilute an air contaminant if designed properly. The design of a ventilation system must match the particular process and chemical or contaminant in use.
Employers may need to use multiple types of controls to prevent employee overexposure.
General exhaust is adequate under normal conditions. If risk of overexposure exists, wear SAA approved respirator.Correct fit is essential to obtain adequate protection. Provide adequate ventilation in warehouse or closed storage areas.
Air contaminants generated in the workplace possess varying "escape" velocities which, in turn, determine the "capture velocities" of fresh circulating air required to effectively remove the contaminant.
Type of Contaminant:
Speed: aerosols, (released at low velocity into zone of active generation) 0.5-1 m/s direct spray, spray painting in shallow booths, gas discharge (active generation into zone of rapid air motion) 1-2.5 m/s (200-500 f/min.)
Within each range the appropriate value depends on:
Lower end of the range Upper end of the range 1: Room air currents minimal or favourable to capture
1: Disturbing room air currents
2: Contaminants of low toxicity or of nuisance value only2: Contaminants of high toxicity
3: Intermittent, low production.3: High production, heavy use
4: Large hood or large air mass in motion4: Small hood-local control only Simple theory shows that air velocity falls rapidly with distance away from the opening of a simple extraction pipe. Velocity generally decreases with the square of distance from the extraction point (in simple cases). Therefore the air speed at the extraction point should be adjusted, accordingly, after reference to distance from the contaminating source. The air velocity at the extraction fan, for example, should be a minimum of 1-2 m/s (200-400 f/min.) for extraction of solvents generated in a tank 2 meters distant from the extraction point. Other mechanical considerations, producing performance deficits within the extraction apparatus, make it essential that theoretical air velocities are multiplied by factors of 10 or more when extraction systems are installed or used.
Personal protective equipment
Eye and face protection
No special equipment for minor exposure i.e. when handling small quantities.
OTHERWISE: For potentially moderate or heavy exposures:
Safety glasses with side shields.
NOTE: Contact lenses pose a special hazard; soft lenses may absorb irritants and ALL lenses concentrate them.
Skin protection
See Hand protection below
Recommended material(s)
GLOVE SELECTION
INDEX Glove selection is based on a modified presentation of the: "Forsberg Clothing Performance Index".
The effect(s) of the following substance(s) are taken into account in the computer-generated selection:
Freezing Spray, 200 grm Aerosol Not Available
Material CPI *
CPI - Chemwatch Performance Index
A: Best Selection
B: Satisfactory; may degrade after 4 hours continuous immersion C: Poor to Dangerous Choice for other than short term immersion NOTE: As a series of factors will influence the actual performance of the glove, a final selection must be based on detailed observation. - * Where the glove is to be used on a short term, casual or infrequent basis, factors such as "feel" or convenience (e.g. disposability), may dictate a choice of gloves which might otherwise be unsuitable following long-term or frequent use. A qualified practitioner should be consulted
Body protection
The clothing worn by process operators insulated from earth may develop static charges far higher (up to 100 times) than the minimum ignition energies for various flammable gas-air mixtures. This holds true for a wide range of clothing materials including cotton.
Avoid dangerous levels of charge by ensuring a low resistivity of the surface material worn outermost.
BRETHERICK: Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards.
No special equipment needed when handling small quantities. OTHERWISE: Overalls.
Skin cleansing cream.
Eyewash unit.
Do not spray on hot surfaces.
Respiratory protection
Type AX Filter of sufficient capacity. (AS/NZS 1716 & 1715, EN 143:2000 & 149:2001, ANSI Z88 or national equivalent)
Selection of the Class and Type of respirator will depend upon the level of breathing zone contaminant and the chemical nature of the contaminant. Protection Factors (defined as the ratio of contaminant outside and inside the mask) may also be important.
Required minimum protection factor. up to 10 1000 AX-AUS / Class1
Maximum gas/vapour concentration present in air p.p.m. (by volume) Half-face Respirator Full-Face Respirator up to 10 1000 AX-AUS / Class1 - up to 50 1000 - AX-AUS / Class 1 up to 50 5000 Airline * - up to 100 5000 - AX-2 up to 100 10000 - AX-3 100+ Airline** *
Continuous Flow ** -
Continuous-flow or positive pressure demand A(All classes) = Organic vapours, B AUS or B1 = Acid gasses, B2 = Acid gas or hydrogen cyanide(HCN), B3 = Acid gas or hydrogen cyanide(HCN), E = Sulfur dioxide(SO2), G = Agricultural chemicals, K = Ammonia(NH3), Hg = Mercury, NO = Oxides of nitrogen, MB = Methyl bromide, AX = Low boiling point organic compounds(below 65 degC)
9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
General information
Appearance
Extremely flammable clear oily liquid / spray; does not mix with water
Odour
Not available.
pH
Not applicable.
Vapour Pressure
379 kpa
Density
0.85
Boiling Point
Not available.
Melting Point
Not available.
Solubility
in water (g/L) Immiscible
Specific Gravity of Density
Not available.
Flash Point
-30°C
Flammable (Explosive) Limits
Highly flammable.
Ignition Temperature
Not available.
Formula
Not available.
10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
Reactivity
No further relevant information available.
Chemical stability
Elevated temperatures.
Presence of open flame.
Product is considered stable.
Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
Possibility of hazardous reactions
No further relevant information available.
Conditions to avoid
No further relevant information available.
Incompatible materials
No further relevant information available.
11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Acute effects
Limited evidence suggests that repeated or long-term occupational exposure may produce cumulative health effects involving organs or biochemical systems. Principal route of occupational exposure to the gas is by inhalation.
Eye contact
Limited evidence exists, or practical experience suggests, that the material may cause eye irritation in a substantial number of individuals and/or is expected to produce significant ocular lesions which are present twenty-four hours or more after instillation into the eye(s) of experimental animals. Repeated or prolonged eye contact may cause inflammation characterised by temporary redness (similar to windburn) of the conjunctiva (conjunctivitis); temporary impairment of vision and/or other transient eye damage/ulceration may occur.
Direct contact with the eye may not cause irritation because of the extreme volatility of the gas; however concentrated atmospheres may produce irritation after brief exposures.
Skin contact
Limited evidence exists, or practical experience predicts, that the material either produces inflammation of the skin in a substantial number of individuals following direct contact, and/or produces significant inflammation when applied to the healthy intact skin of animals, for up to four hours, such inflammation being present twenty-four hours or more after the end of the exposure period. Skin irritation may also be present after prolonged or repeated exposure; this may result in a form of contact dermatitis (nonallergic). The dermatitis is often characterised by skin redness (erythema) and swelling (oedema) which may progress to blistering (vesiculation), scaling and thickening of the epidermis. At the microscopic level there may be intercellular oedema of the spongy layer of the skin (spongiosis) and intracellular oedema of the epidermis. Spray mist may produce discomfort.
Open cuts, abraded or irritated skin should not be exposed to this material
Entry into the blood-stream through, for example, cuts, abrasions, puncture wounds or lesions, may produce systemic injury with harmful effects. Examine the skin prior to the use of the material and ensure that any external damage is suitably protected.
Ingestion
Accidental ingestion of the material may be damaging to the health of the individual.
Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
Considered an unlikely route of entry in commercial/industrial environments.
Inhalation
Limited evidence or practical experience suggests that the material may produce irritation of the respiratory system, in a significant number of individuals, following inhalation. In contrast to most organs, the lung is able to respond to a chemical insult by first removing or neutralising the irritant and then repairing the damage. The repair process, which initially evolved to protect mammalian lungs from foreign matter and antigens, may however, produce further lung damage resulting in the impairment of gas exchange, the primary function of the lungs. Respiratory tract irritation often results in an inflammatory response involving the recruitment and activation of many cell types, mainly derived from the vascular system. WARNING:Intentional misuse by concentrating/inhaling contents may be lethal.
Toxicity and irritation
Limited evidence suggests that repeated or long-term occupational exposure may produce cumulative health effects involving organs or biochemical systems.
Principal route of occupational exposure to the gas is by inhalation.
No significant acute toxicological data identified in literature search. for Petroleum Hydrocarbon Gases:
In many cases, there is more than one potentially toxic constituent in a refinery gas. In those cases, the constituent that is most toxic for a particular endpoint in an individual refinery stream is used to characterise the endpoint hazard for that stream. The hazard potential for each mammalian endpoint for each of the petroleum hydrocarbon gases is dependent upon each petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituent endpoint toxicity values (LC50, LOAEL, etc.) and the relative concentration of the constituent present in that gas. It should also be noted that for an individual petroleum hydrocarbon gas, the constituent characterizing toxicity may be different for different mammalian endpoints, again, being dependent upon the concentration of the different constituents in each, distinct petroleum hydrocarbon gas.
All Hydrocarbon Gases Category members contain primarily hydrocarbons (i.e., alkanes and alkenes) and occasionally asphyxiant gases like hydrogen. The inorganic components of the petroleum hydrocarbon gases are less toxic than the C1 - C4 and C5 - C6 hydrocarbon components to both mammalian and aquatic organisms. Unlike other petroleum product categories (e.g. gasoline, diesel fuel, lubricating oils, etc.), the inorganic and hydrocarbon constituents of hydrocarbon gases can be evaluated for hazard individually to then predict the screening level hazard of the Category members
Acute toxicity.
No acute toxicity LC50 values have been derived for the C1 -C4 and C5- C6 hydrocarbon (HC) fractions because no mortality was observed at the highest exposure levels tested (~ 5 mg/l) for these petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents. The order of acute toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents from most to least toxic is: C5-C6 HCs (LC50 > 1063 ppm) > C1-C4 HCs (LC50 > 10,000 ppm) > benzene (LC50 = 13,700 ppm) > butadiene (LC50 = 129,000 ppm) > asphyxiant gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen).
Repeat dose toxicity: With the exception of the asphyxiant gases, repeated dose toxicity has been observed in individual selected petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents. Based upon LOAEL values, the order of order of repeated-dose toxicity of these constituents from most toxic to the least toxic is: Benzene (LOAEL .>=10 ppm) >C1-C4 HCs (LOAEL = 5,000 ppm; assumed to be 100% 2-butene) > C5-C6 HCs (LOAEL = 6,625 ppm) > butadiene (LOAEL = 8,000 ppm) > asphyxiant gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen).
Genotoxicity:
In vitro: The majority of the Petroleum Hydrocarbon Gases
Category components are negative for in vitro genotoxicity. The exceptions are: benzene and 1,3-butadiene, which are genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian in vitro test systems. In vivo: The majority of the Petroleum Hydrocarbon Gases Category components are negative for in vivo genotoxicity. The exceptions are benzene and 1,3-butadiene, which are genotoxic in in vivo test systems Developmental toxicity: Developmental effects were induced by two of the petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents, benzene and the C5 -C6 hydrocarbon fraction. No developmental toxicity was observed at the highest exposure levels tested for the other petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents tested for this effect. The asphyxiant gases have not been tested for developmental toxicity. Based on LOAEL and NOAEL values, the order of acute toxicity of these constituents from most to least toxic is:
Benzene (LOAEL = 20 ppm) > butadiene (NOAEL .>=1,000 ppm) > C5-C6 HCs (LOAEL = 3,463 ppm) > C1-C4 HCs (NOAEL >=5,000 ppm; assumed to be 100% 2-butene) > asphyxiant gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen). Reproductive toxicity:
Reproductive effects were induced by only two petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents, benzene and isobutane (a constituent of the the C1-C4 hydrocarbon fraction). No reproductive toxicity was observed at the highest exposure levels tested for the other petroleum hydrocarbon gas constituents tested for this effect. The asphyxiant gases have not been tested for reproductive toxicity. Based on LOAEL and NOAEL values, the order of reproductive toxicity of these constituents from most to least toxic is: Benzene (LOAEL = 300 ppm) > butadiene (NOAEL .>=6,000 ppm) > C5-C6 HCs (NOAEL .>=6,521 ppm) > C1-C4 HCs (LOAEL = 9,000 ppm; assumed to be 100% isobutane) > asphyxiant gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen)
12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Ecotoxicity
No further relevant information available.
Persistence and degradability
No further relevant information available.
Bioaccumulative potential
No further relevant information available.
Other adverse effects
No further relevant information available.
13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
General information
Legislation addressing waste disposal requirements may differ by country, state and/ or territory. Each user must refer to laws operating in their area. In some areas, certain wastes must be tracked.
A Hierarchy of Controls seems to be common - the user should investigate.
Reduction
Reuse
Recycling
Disposal (if all else fails)
This material may be recycled if unused, or if it has not been contaminated so as to make it unsuitable for its intended use. If it has been contaminated, it may be possible to reclaim the product by filtration, distillation or some other means. Shelf life considerations should also be applied in making decisions of this type. Note that properties of a material may change in use, and recycling or reuse may not always be appropriate. DO NOT allow wash water from cleaning or process equipment to enter drains.
It may be necessary to collect all wash water for treatment before disposal. In all cases disposal to sewer may be subject to local laws and regulations and these should be considered first.
Where in doubt contact the responsible authority. Consult State Land Waste Management Authority for disposal.
Discharge contents of damaged aerosol cans at an approved site.
Allow small quantities to evaporate.
DO NOT incinerate or puncture aerosol cans.
Bury residues and emptied aerosol cans at an approved site.
14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION
ADG label required
HAZCHEM
Not available.

UN Number
UN1950
Proper shipping name
AEROSOLS
Transport hazard class
2.1
Packing group
Environmental hazard
No information available.
Special precautions for users
63 190 277 327 344
Limited quantity See SP 277
Additional information
No information available.
15. REGULATORY INFORMATION
Poisons Schedule Number
Hydrocarbon propellant(68476-85-7.) is found
Other Information
Hydrocarbon propellant 68476-85-7., 68476-86-
16. OTHER INFORMATION
SDS preparation date
25 July 2017
Comments
This information is based on our present knowledge. However, this shall not constitute a guarantee for any specific product features and shall not establish a legally valid contractual relationship.
This Safety Data Sheet (SDS) has been prepared in compliance with the Preparation of Safety Data Sheets for Hazardous Chemicals Code of Practice February 2016. It is the user's responsibility to determine the suitability of this information for adoption of necessary safety precautions. The information published in this SDS has been compiled from the publications listed in Section 16: to the best of our ability and knowledge these publications are considered accurate. We reserve the right to revise Safety Data Sheets as new information becomes available. Copies may be made for non-profit use.

... End of SDS ...